Montana Fishing License

Montana Fishing License: How Long Does It Last?

Montana, a paradise for anglers, offers a diverse range of fishing experiences. From cold water to warm water, big prairie rivers to high mountain lakes, and fly-fishing to trolling, Montana has it all. But before you cast your line, it’s essential to understand the regulations surrounding the Montana Fishing License.

The Basics Of Montana Fishing License

Montana, the 4th largest state by land area, is a paradise for fishing enthusiasts. With its diverse aquatic habitats ranging from cold water to warm water, big prairie rivers to high mountain lakes, Montana offers angling opportunities for all to enjoy. However, to fish in the state’s waters, you need a valid fishing license if you’re 12 or older. This license allows you to fish for and possess any fish or aquatic invertebrate authorized by the state’s fishing regulations. It’s important to note that the license is nontransferable and nonrefundable.

Montana Fishing License
Montana Fishing License

Age Groups for Fishing License Requirements

The fishing license requirements in Montana vary based on age groups. Here’s a breakdown:

  • 11 and under: No fishing license is required, but they must still observe all limits and regulations.
  • 12-15: A fishing license is required. The cost for residents is $4, while for non-residents it’s $10.
  • 16-17: A fishing license is required. The cost for residents is $4, while for non-residents it’s $10.
  • 18-61: A fishing license is required. The cost for residents is $21, while for non-residents it’s $100.
  • 62 and older: A fishing license is required. The cost for residents is $10.50, while for non-residents it’s $100.

Duration of the License

The Full Season Fishing License enables you to fish from March 1 through the end of February of the following year. This means that your fishing license is valid for almost a full year, giving you ample time to enjoy the diverse fishing opportunities that Montana offers.

Additional Information

In addition to the fishing license, the Angler Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Pass (AISPP) is required for all individuals who fish in Montana. The 2017 Montana Legislature established this program to aid in funding the fight against aquatic invasive species.

Before you head out to fish, make sure to identify which fishing district you will be fishing in (Eastern, Central, or Western). Read the Standard Regulations that apply to all waters in that district. Look up the specific water you will be fishing to see if it is listed as an exception to the standard regulations.

Remember, fishing isn’t just about catching fish. It’s about enjoying the great outdoors, spending time with family and friends, and experiencing the thrill of the catch. So, get your fishing license, grab your gear, and head out to the beautiful waters of Montana for an unforgettable fishing adventure!

Cost of the License

The cost of the license varies depending on your residency status and age. Here’s a quick breakdown:

Residency Status Age Cost
Resident Adult $21
Resident Youth (12-17) $10.50
Resident Senior (62+) $10.50
Nonresident $100

Special Licenses and Permits

Montana also offers special licenses and permits for residents with disabilities, residents who are blind, and residents of state institutions. For instance, a Montana resident with a disability can purchase a Conservation License for $8, an AIS Prevention Pass for $2, and a Fishing License for $10.50.

Fishing Seasons in Montana

Montana’s fishing seasons vary depending on the district and the type of water body. However, most lakes and reservoirs are open all year. It’s always a good idea to check the specific regulations for the water you will be fishing.

Comparing Montana Fishing License with Other States

If you’re considering fishing in other states, it’s worth comparing the fishing license regulations. For instance, you might want to check out the fishing license regulations in Florida, Alabama, or Alaska.

In conclusion, the Montana Fishing License provides a full year of fishing opportunities. Whether you’re a resident or a visitor, make sure you’re equipped with the right license before you head out to the water.

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